‘La Terrine de legumes’ – An Easter brunch favorite

March 17th, 2013 § 2 comments § permalink

Spring vegetable terrine | photo Geralda @ Spresso.nl
I’ve always loved Easter brunch.
And the egg hunt. Oh yes, the egg hunt… I still bother Dutchie and all my friends every year, begging for it like a 5 years old. Soon, it will be Petit Tom ūüėČ
And then there is la Brioche (de papa) , et la Terrine de legumes (de Maman)… It’s ok. I’ll bake them.
» Read the rest of this entry «

Perfect monday…

April 20th, 2009 § 0 comments § permalink

Off early, coffee and a chat¬†with a good girlfriend on the sunny terasse in the garden… followed with a couple of glasses of my favourite white cote du Rhone (a Mont Redon), a couple of calls and off we are for an impromptu dinner. A short trip to my local shopping street for a bunch of the best asperges around, a kilo of¬†tiny new¬†potatoes, a large cote de boeuf as tender as butter and the first strawberries of the season… More friends,¬†a little bit of peeling, fresh herbs from the garden, a bit of salt and¬†pepper, a drop of olive oil and¬†a pinch of vanilla. No fuss, laughters and wine, satisfied smiles and full stomachs.

Today, I love mondays….

 

Asperges

» Read the rest of this entry «

A time for soup

February 1st, 2008 § 0 comments § permalink

Lately, I am craving for my bed,¬†a lot of¬†sleep and soup! Chicken soup, leek and curry soup, fennel soup, celeriac and spinach soup… I¬† just can’t get enough!


Not surprising you would say, with all those microbes and viruses running around lately:¬†I am surrounded by running noses,¬†low¬†hoarse voices and feverish eyes… My dutchie and I didn’t make an exception to the rule and are both trying to cope¬†the best we can.¬†¬†At least one good thing¬†to the story: for¬†once, I manage to have him eat soup without (hardly) any¬†complaints!

In case you too are having trouble to crawl out of bed, desperatly looking for yet another pack of tissues, while¬†your nose has nothing more to envy to the nose of that clown you laughed so much about at the christmas circus, I’d thought I would share a bowl of¬†my favourite¬†chestnut soup with you! It’s heartwarming,¬†smooth and velvety… and it doesn’t only work great for colds: with a few thin slices of foie gras or of¬†smoked duck breast, it’s a great starter to a fancy winter dinner!

Velouté de chataignes

Chestnut cream soup
Velouté de chataignes

serves 6 pers.
prep: 15 min. cook: 25 min

Ingredients:
500g steamed chestnuts (peeled),
900 ml chicken or turkey stock,

10cl liquid cream,
1 knob of butter,
1 small shallot, peeled and diced,
sea salt and pepper to taste,
Optional but so good: dices of fresh foie gras to garnish,

In a pan, sauteed half of the chestnuts with the knob of butter for 5 minuts. Lower the fire, add the remaining chestnuts, the shallot and cover with chicken bouillon and the liquid cream. Season to taste with sea salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, lower the heat and simmer covered for 20 to 25 minutes or until the chestnuts are soft. Leave to cool and mix until smooth using a blender (don’t add all the liquid at once so that you can adjust the texture to a velvety creamy soup). Before serving, warm up the soup on low heat. Serve the soup in individual bowls and for a real treat garnish with dices of fresh foie gras sprinkled with ‘fleur de sel’ and freshly crushed pepper.

Bon appétit!


Trick or treat flop

October 31st, 2007 § 0 comments § permalink

Today, just back from work, I settled comfortably in front of my computer with a steaming expresso ready to get blogging when the doorbell started singing… Not expecting anyone. Probably my big friend the doorbell ghost again, I thought¬† (damn interferences!). But we never know, so I got up and went to the door…

Surprisingly, there was someone at the door this time: a ghost actually, the cutest little dutch ghost I’ve ever seen. Halloween! of course, it’s halloween today… Believe it or not, this was my first trick or treat experience ever. Halloween is far not as popular in Europe as it is in America.¬† It didn’t even exist in France when I was a child, and has always seemed to me as one purely commercial event that shops are forcing into our lives to fill their pockets while awaiting the christmas season…She was so cute though. I melted. And then I freaked: I had nothing, not a chocolate bar, not one cookie in the house (I have to take drastic measures to combine food blogging and a decent waistline), maybe a mandarine?… she was not tempted… I felt just like Rachel in one of these episodes of Friends, when she rushes to her checkbook when she realises she’s out of treats… What a flop!

I’ve rushed to the shop at the corner in the meantime to get a bag of candy, but my doorbell keeps now desperately silent…

So, to make it up… here’s at least a little pumkin treat, all smooth and velvety, for all the smaller and bigger ghosts who will knock at the door of my blog tonight.


 

pumpkin_cappucino

 

Pumpkin cappuccino
Cappuccino de citrouille

serves 6 (as apetizer*)
prep: 10 min cook: 15 + 20 min

Ingredients:
A small butternut squash (~350g), peeled, seeded and roughly cut in ~0.5 to 1cm thick slices,
1 Tsp olive oil,
1 apple, chopped,
1 shallot, chopped,
1/2 tsp ginger powder (fresh should be great to, but I didnt have any at the time),
3 pods of cardamon
1 knob of butter,
50 cl chicken stock**
15 cl milk,
10 cl liquid cream,
sea salt and pepper to taste
To serve:
Whipped cream or creme fraiche,
Cardamon, crushed.
Preheat the oven at 200 deg C.
Line a baking tray with baking foil. Put the pumpkin slices on the tray, drizzle with the tablespon olive oil and season with salt. Toss gently and bake for about 15 min or until the pumkin flesh soften.
In a pan, warm up the butter on medium fire and add the chopped shallot, ginger and cardamon. When the onion is translucid (~5min), add the apple, pumpkin and cover with the stock. After the first boil, lower the fire and cover. Simmer for 15 min. Leave to cool for 10 min. Remove the cardamon pods. Then, add the milk and cream and blend until smooth.
To serve, warm the pumpkin cream on low fire, and pour in nice glasses or coffee cups, top with a generous lump of whipped cream or creme fraiche and sprinkle with cardamon. Serve immediately.

Cheers!


* Double the proportions, if you wish to serve this cappuccino as a starter.
** If your stock is very concentrated, cut it with water so that it doesn’t overpower the pumpkin.

Frost, defrost, no-frost… brunch?

October 22nd, 2007 § 0 comments § permalink

kwarktaart2appeltaart2croissants

While my dutchie is a cycling freak and could spend hours looking and shopping for fancy expensive cycling gear, I, as a lazy gourmande, have something for fancy kitchen equipment… six pit stoves, professional gas-ovens, or just the kitchen aid department¬† at my favourite cook shop make my eyes shine with envy. Fridges are no exception though they are a little bit lower on my excitement scale. I dreamt for the cool and airy space of a fridge and freezer large enough to handle my saturday morning market escapades and our returns from France and our unevitable stops at the king of the supermarkets, … Carrouf*.

We’ve had it with our small-ugly-old fridge. It helped us getting started, and we’re glad. But it had its time: all door handles are broken and the freezer compartment has turned in an ice generating machine. So, there we went and buy a new fridge. Given the size of our kitchen, the limitations were high… but we found it: a high aluminium one door fridge/freezer combination with temperature management and a no-frost system of course!¬†

Like a kid, my dutchie wanted to take it right away, but (luckily) they didn’t have it in stock so we had to wait a few more days for the delivery. The next friday, there it was at last. The small-ugly-old fridge was emptied and set to wait on the terrasse in no time. First cleaning up, power on… one hour waiting. We could see the led temperature quickly dropping to arctic temperatures. There we were. After the required indicated time we transfered our new food cargo recently acquired on our last trip to France back into the freezing cold. Happy like hippoes we feasted and celebrated our new fridge before falling into the arms of Morpheus with happy food dreams.

 

The next morning, my dutchie was up early to prepare a nice breakfast with croissants that he had prepared and frozen the week before. Berezina… For whatever reason our new acquisition revealed to be a defrost instead of a no-frost! It just didn’t work… After a whole night, everything was defrosted: the farm chicken, the charolais T-bone steak, the duck breasts, the croissants dough, the morrocan pancakes, the rolls of flaky pastry… We could have cried, (I would have if I was not under the schock)… we put the small-ugly-old fridge back on, right there on the terrasse and we decided to party! I spent the whole day in the kitchen, making stews of what could be stewed, tarts, quiches and terrines while my dutchie called around our closest friends to put a large improvised sunday brunch together….

brunch

That was a fun cooking frenzy weekend topped with a great sunday brunch shared with good friends… and I now have a whole set of new recipes to share with you: From home made croissants to salmon terrine passing by apple tarts, moroccan pancakes, chicory quiche, tarte au fromage blanc and a chicken and raisins tajine!

*  Carrefour or Carrouf for the nostalgic expatriated french. The holy grail of the french supermarkets.

Hungry? here’s to begin with:

Salmon terrine with fresh herbs from the garden
Terrine de saumon aux herbes du jardin 

salmon_terrine1

serves 6 to 8
prep: 10 min cook: 30 min

Ingredients:
250g salmon fillet, roughly diced,
1 shallot, chopped,
3 eggs,
15cl liquid cream,
juice of 1/2 lemon,
2 Tsp olive oil,
1 handful chopped parsley,
1 handful chopped chives,
2 sprigs of basil, chopped,
a few mint leaves, chopped,

sea salt, pepper and chili pepper to taste

Preheat the oven at 180 deg C.
Put the diced salmon, chopped shallot and the 3 eggs in the bowl of a blender or food processor. Add the liquid cream, lemon juice, olive oil and season to taste with salt, pepper and chili pepper. Blend until liquid and smooth. Stir the herbs into the mixture.
Pour in a greased medium size terrine (~15cm) and cover with baking foil. Bake ‘au bain marie’ * in the oven for 30min.
Leave to cool completely at room temperature. Then, forget in the fridge for at least an hour. Serve cold as an aperitif with toasts or as a starter with mixed young leaves. You can serve it with lemon,  a homemade  mayonnaise, or a fresh tomato sauce made of thinly chopped fresh tomatoes, 1 small grated clove, fruity olive oil, a dash of lemon and basil.

Bon appétit!


**
“Au bain marie” is a french cooking term. It means putting the baking dish in a larger one partly filled with warm water right in the oven. It’s often used to bake terrine, mousses or cremes brulees.

Fish! I like it RAW! (3)

August 18th, 2006 § 0 comments § permalink

Last week, I was almost finished with the 3rd opus of my raw fish special… I was talking about raw fish of course, but I also allowed myself in alyric prose about my addiction to the covered market “Les Halles” in my home town and all its marvels. I was about to press the “post and publish” key when I saw a typo. And then, everything just disappeared: I pressed backspace¬† instead of delete and my post was gone… pfffuit! Impossible to get my post back. I was so upset that I didn’t find the courage to post again until now. I don’t feel the mind of a poet today, so you’ll have to wait for another time to hear abouty my love for “Les Halles”. However, we never know, there might still be a few hot summer nights to come (maybe not in Holland this year but we never know), and this last recipe might tempt you.

I improvised this 3rd recipe during a trip in my hometown Nimes in the hottest month of the summer 2005… It makes a fresh apetizer or starter for the hot summer nights in betwen two games of petanque. Take a glass of pastis or a chilled rose and enjoy!

last_summer_cod

Cod fish and fennel carppacio

4 to 8 pers. prep: 10 min

Ingredients:
600g fresh cod fish filet
1 small fennel bulb

1/2  lemon

1 lime
4 Tsp. olive oil (fruity but not too strong)
2 Tsp. of pastis

a small handfull of dill
sea salt, pepper

Clean¬†your cod fish and put it in the freezer for at least half an hour. Wash and slice the fennel: get rid of the damaged first leaves cut in two and remove the hard part of the hart with a small knife. slice very thinly (a few mm) with a mandoline. Slice the lime in very thin slices too (with a mandoline). Finally cut the fish in thin slices with a sharp knife (1/2 cm or thiner if you like). In a deep and large serving dish, lay down the fish, if possible in one layer and put the fennel and lime over it. Add the dill and Season with sea salt (preferably “fleur de sel”) and fresh grounded peper. Prepare your marinade: mix the juice of half of a lemon with the olive oil and pastis. Pour over the fish, and forget it in the fridge while you enjoy the summer sun or the shade of an old tree, a glass of pastis, a siesta… Serve as an apetizer or starter.¬†

Bon appétit!
 

Fish! I like it RAW! (2)

July 29th, 2006 § 0 comments § permalink

As promised in my previous post, here is my second of this summer “raw fish” special coming right out of the kitchen…

cod_passion

Fresh cod fish in passion fruit marinade

2 pers. prep: 10 min

Ingredients:
300g fresh cod fish filet

1/2  lemon

1 Tsp. olive oil (fruity but not too strong)
a few leaves of fresh basilic
1 or 2 chili peppers
a pinch of sugar
sea salt, pepper

Wash your cod fishand put it in the freezer for at least half an hour. Prepare your marinade: mix passion fruit flesh withe juice of half of a lemon in your kitchen processor. Pass the juice through a thin sieve, to eliminate the seeds from the passion fruit. Mix the juice, olive oil and the pinch of sugar. Cut your cod fish in slices (~1/2 cm). Put the fish and lemon slices in a tupperware and cover with the marinade, add the chili pepers and chopped basil. Season with sea salt (preferably “fleur de sel”) and fresh grounded peper. Close your tupperware, and here you go again: shake it, baby shake it! and forget it in the fridge while you enjoy the summer sun, a glass of chilled rose, a siesta, I think you know what I mean … Dispose the fish in a nice plate or terrine. Serve as an apetizer or starter.¬†

Bon appétit!

Fish! I like it RAW! (1)

July 28th, 2006 § 0 comments § permalink

Have you ever had the impression of working in a sauna or should I say in hell? Well, today I did…¬† we have no airco at work and the sunscreen of my office just broke down: the thermometer often exceded the 31 C inside today! All that to say, that when I came home, I hardly felt like eating and especially not something warm. Luckily, I’ve become a master at gazpacho’s, fresh salads, carpaccio’s and other fresh recipes. Among my favourites: raw fish! sashimi from my local sushi bar Kiraku* is one of my treats and I’m a fan of the holland’s new herring, eaten right at the fish stall with raw chopped oignons… Please don’t look disgusted, I swear, it’s heaven! and it’s full of Omega 3 as my mum would not fail to highlight. Now, I know not everybody can handle it… so I often indulge my fish in savoury marinades. I’m sure that, that, you can handle! Here is a couple of this summer creations and one of last summer…

But before I go further I will, if you allow me, open a little hygienic parenthesis: It’s no problem to eat raw fish (except maybe if you are pregnant) as long as your fish is of the best quality and as fresh as can be: Choose a fish that smells of the sea. If it’s smells of fish, pass your way! Fish like tuna and salmon may have some parasits. Out of precaution I always put the fish I want to eat raw in the freezer for at least half an hour. My dutchie thinks I am paranoid… but well, I feel better like that and the fish is then easier to cut neatly.

Now, here we go…

salmon_tuna_duo

Tuna and salmon duo in ginger and wazabi marinade

2 pers. prep: 10 min

Ingredients:
200g salmon fillet
200g tuna fillet

1 (bio) lemon

2 Tsp. (japanese) soja saus
2 Tsp. thai fish saus
1 Tsp. sesam oil
1 tsp. wasabi paste (you can put more if you like)
2 Tsp. fresh grated ginger
1 tsp. sugar or honey

sea salt, pepper

Wash your salmon and tuna fillet and put them in the freezer for at least half an hour. Prepare your marinade: mix the soja saus, fish saus, sesam oil, sugar, wasabi paste and ginger. Add the juice of half of a lemon. Cut the rest of a lemon in very thin slices (a couple of mm) using a mandoline. If your lemon is treated brush it well under warm water before use (I use a potato brush). Cut your salmon and tuna in slices, I usually like the pieces to be slightly thick (1/2 to 1cm). Put the fish and lemon slices in a tupperware and cover with the marinade. Close your tupperware, shake it, baby shake it! and forget it in the fridge, time to enjoy the sun in the garden, have an aperitif or for longer. Dispose the fish in a nice plate or terrine with the lemon on top.

Bon appétit!

* Kiraku sushi bar:
Toussaintkade 31
Den Haag
070-3454288
www.kiraku.nl

"Blog appétit" or how to become a foodblog addict (EN)

May 25th, 2006 § 0 comments § permalink

As promised: a translation of my contribution to Blog appetit (I have tried without much success to make it a bit more concise than the french version, because frankly… I talk too much!)

As I acknowledged to my french readers, I have a secret: the “blog appetit” contest is at the origin of my food blog addiction… Everything started about a year ago when I inadvertantly discovered the website. Since, beside my growing addiction to food blogs, I have been secretely cherishing the dream of creating my very own blog and of course participating to Blog appetit myself. In my small dutch kitchen I have been working on most editions… but I still had to have a blog. Two months ago¬† (I know, rapidity is not my speciality), I finally did it with My Kitchen Diaries.

asparagus_bouquet2
The most sexy dutch blonds!

After what I just told you, there was no way I would miss the latest edition. The idea of the contest is simple: food bloggers propose a recipe based on two season ingredients chosen by the Blog appetit team. For each edition, a famous chef or gastronomy figure judges the submitted recipes and proposes aher own creation. For this edition, the stars of the show were strawberries and asparagus. It might seem like a strange pairing to more than one of you, but I was thrilled: I just love both of them. At home the precious “guariguettes” strawberries my mom would buy at the market had trouble to get to the table as I was stealing them directly from the basket! Still today, I cannot imagine one of my birthdays without strawberries. As far as asparagus are concerned, I was spoiled too. I grew up in Languedoc where we would buy beautiful green asparagus directly at the field, through most of spring and summer. I would pick up wild aparagus in the guarrigue as well. Mmmm, I still remember the taste of a wild asparagus omelette! Luckily, nowadays, I am still spoiled with these two ingredients. The sandy soils of the flat country where I now live is generous in my two spring favourites. Local strawberries are fragrant and tasty and the asparagus, the dutch white gold, so delicate and tender… You got it, I love them too. Thanks to Blog appetit I ate as many as wanted this year… for the sake of culinary experimentation of course!

After several attempts, I chose for a starter. It is quite a simple dish as this is how I enjoy to cook. I wanted to highlight the strawberries and asparagus and therefore I didn’t add many other flavours. To enhance my two star ingredients, I chose for vanilla that I regularly use in my asparagus dressing and argan oil for a nutty (moroccan) touch.

Here is the result:

aspege_mousse11

aspege_mousse23 

Mousse d’asperges blanches a la vanille et son coulis de fraises a l’huile d’argan
(Asparagus and vanilla mousse with its strawberry and argan oil dressing)

6 pers. prep: 20 min cook.:35 min

Ingredients:
For the mousse:
500 g asparagus
2 eggs
1/2 vanille pod
1 Tsp. “creme fraiche” with 15% fat (or sour cream)
salt, pepper

for the dressing:
5 ripe and fragrant dutch strawberries
4 or five asparagus ends (4 ou 5)
1 tsp. raspberry vinegar
1 Tsp. argan oil
5cl cooking water from the asparagus
fleur de sel, pepper
For decoration purposes (and because it’s good):
a few peeled dutch shrimps (the little grey ones)
ricottas sandy biscuits (salty ones of course)
asparagus tips (green, white or both)
strawberries

For the mousse, I was inspired by the recipe of Auyo on marmiton (fr) : Preheat your oven at 170 degres. Peel the asparagus. Cook them in salted boiling water, together with ends and peels, until tender (about 15 min). Put aside 4 or five asparagus ends (by this I mean the bottom part by the way) and about 5 cl of the cooking water. Drain the asparagus well and dry them in a kitchen towel. Put them in the bowl of your food processor and add the vanilla seeds that you will have scrapped from the pod, the eggs, the creme fraiche. Season with salt and pepper. Mix until you get a smooth cream. Pour into 6 greased little moulds. Stand these in an appropriately sized oven dish filled with water half-way up the moulds. Bake in the preheated oven for approximately 35 min until the mousse has set (adjust according to your oven). Take out of the oven and leave to cool.For the dressing, pour the ingredients in the food processor, mix until smooth. Refrigerate.

Ideally, this starter should be prepared in advance (the day before or in the morning for the evening) so that flavours have time to develop. Serve the mousse slightly warm, with the dressing chilled. Dress your plates with one mousse, and a ribbon of dressing around (im my picture, it is more a pond than a riibon!). According to your moodand imagination, add strawberries and asparagus tips. I added one ricotta sandy biscuit and some dutch grey shrimps. The shrimps were a real plus and where a great combination with the mousse. I didn’t reveal the ingredients to my guinea pigs until after they tasted. It was a success.

Blog appétit!

… If you happen to have some leftover dressing, here is a very simple but appealing apetizer:

asperge_stjacques1 

The scallop is just seared, seasoned with fleur de sel, ground pepper and vanilla

If you know a little bit of french, I advise you to go and have a look at the other creations proposed by talented food bloggers for this blog appetit edition. From risotto and chutney to asparagus sorbet and sweets… some are really amazing. An overview of all recipes is available here.

“Blog app√©tit” or how to become a foodblog addict (EN)

May 25th, 2006 § 0 comments § permalink

As promised: a translation of my contribution to Blog appetit (I have tried without much success to make it a bit more concise than the french version, because frankly… I talk too much!)

As I acknowledged to my french readers, I have a secret: the “blog appetit” contest is at the origin of my food blog addiction… Everything started about a year ago when I inadvertantly discovered the website. Since, beside my growing addiction to food blogs, I have been secretely cherishing the dream of creating my very own blog and of course participating to Blog appetit myself. In my small dutch kitchen I have been working on most editions… but I still had to have a blog. Two months ago¬† (I know, rapidity is not my speciality), I finally did it with My Kitchen Diaries.

asparagus_bouquet2
The most sexy dutch blonds!

After what I just told you, there was no way I would miss the latest edition. The idea of the contest is simple: food bloggers propose a recipe based on two season ingredients chosen by the Blog appetit team. For each edition, a famous chef or gastronomy figure judges the submitted recipes and proposes aher own creation. For this edition, the stars of the show were strawberries and asparagus. It might seem like a strange pairing to more than one of you, but I was thrilled: I just love both of them. At home the precious “guariguettes” strawberries my mom would buy at the market had trouble to get to the table as I was stealing them directly from the basket! Still today, I cannot imagine one of my birthdays without strawberries. As far as asparagus are concerned, I was spoiled too. I grew up in Languedoc where we would buy beautiful green asparagus directly at the field, through most of spring and summer. I would pick up wild aparagus in the guarrigue as well. Mmmm, I still remember the taste of a wild asparagus omelette! Luckily, nowadays, I am still spoiled with these two ingredients. The sandy soils of the flat country where I now live is generous in my two spring favourites. Local strawberries are fragrant and tasty and the asparagus, the dutch white gold, so delicate and tender… You got it, I love them too. Thanks to Blog appetit I ate as many as wanted this year… for the sake of culinary experimentation of course!

After several attempts, I chose for a starter. It is quite a simple dish as this is how I enjoy to cook. I wanted to highlight the strawberries and asparagus and therefore I didn’t add many other flavours. To enhance my two star ingredients, I chose for vanilla that I regularly use in my asparagus dressing and argan oil for a nutty (moroccan) touch.

Here is the result:

aspege_mousse11

aspege_mousse23 

Mousse d’asperges blanches a la vanille et son coulis de fraises a l’huile d’argan
(Asparagus and vanilla mousse with its strawberry and argan oil dressing)

6 pers. prep: 20 min cook.:35 min

Ingredients:
For the mousse:
500 g asparagus
2 eggs
1/2 vanille pod
1 Tsp. “creme fraiche” with 15% fat (or sour cream)
salt, pepper

for the dressing:
5 ripe and fragrant dutch strawberries
4 or five asparagus ends (4 ou 5)
1 tsp. raspberry vinegar
1 Tsp. argan oil
5cl cooking water from the asparagus
fleur de sel, pepper
For decoration purposes (and because it’s good):
a few peeled dutch shrimps (the little grey ones)
ricottas sandy biscuits (salty ones of course)
asparagus tips (green, white or both)
strawberries

For the mousse, I was inspired by the recipe of Auyo on marmiton (fr) : Preheat your oven at 170 degres. Peel the asparagus. Cook them in salted boiling water, together with ends and peels, until tender (about 15 min). Put aside 4 or five asparagus ends (by this I mean the bottom part by the way) and about 5 cl of the cooking water. Drain the asparagus well and dry them in a kitchen towel. Put them in the bowl of your food processor and add the vanilla seeds that you will have scrapped from the pod, the eggs, the creme fraiche. Season with salt and pepper. Mix until you get a smooth cream. Pour into 6 greased little moulds. Stand these in an appropriately sized oven dish filled with water half-way up the moulds. Bake in the preheated oven for approximately 35 min until the mousse has set (adjust according to your oven). Take out of the oven and leave to cool.For the dressing, pour the ingredients in the food processor, mix until smooth. Refrigerate.

Ideally, this starter should be prepared in advance (the day before or in the morning for the evening) so that flavours have time to develop. Serve the mousse slightly warm, with the dressing chilled. Dress your plates with one mousse, and a ribbon of dressing around (im my picture, it is more a pond than a riibon!). According to your moodand imagination, add strawberries and asparagus tips. I added one ricotta sandy biscuit and some dutch grey shrimps. The shrimps were a real plus and where a great combination with the mousse. I didn’t reveal the ingredients to my guinea pigs until after they tasted. It was a success.

Blog appétit!

… If you happen to have some leftover dressing, here is a very simple but appealing apetizer:

asperge_stjacques1 

The scallop is just seared, seasoned with fleur de sel, ground pepper and vanilla

If you know a little bit of french, I advise you to go and have a look at the other creations proposed by talented food bloggers for this blog appetit edition. From risotto and chutney to asparagus sorbet and sweets… some are really amazing. An overview of all recipes is available here.

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