Chicken Teriyaki with love

February 7th, 2013 § 2 comments § permalink

At home, I am the sweet tooth. Dutchie’s sweet spot is meat, and above all: chicken. I know I just can have him melt for a bucket of fried chicken or a good chicken Teriyaki.

Chicken Teriyaki
Fried chicken ain’t nothing for me and it might take some more years before I get to fry chicken.

Teriyaki is another story. It’s the Tarte Tatin to our chicken… Something between me and him.

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On food moods, makeovers and sweet and sour homemade goodies

October 31st, 2012 § 5 comments § permalink

No, no, no, I haven’t deserted the kitchen due to a lack of dairy… I’m still here! Cooking more than ever and  back on dairy (Yes!) just like Petit Tom (Yes! Yes! Yes!).

I’ve got exciting news (old news though for my FB followers): I have started my own company this summer and it’s a complete carreer change…

 

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Peasto

April 4th, 2009 § 0 comments § permalink

The lazy gourmande has once again been hibernating for a while (and so has her kitchen diaries). But winter is over and it’s getting hungry again.

I hope you guys haven’t lost faith in seeing me again around the kitchen? I’ll try to make it up to you. To start with, something green, fresh, velvety and fragrant. Something like spring to cheer up your aperitif or a dish of fresh pasta with friends.

Peastou

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How I don’t mind queuing at the butcher

November 28th, 2008 § 9 comments § permalink

Hare filet with candied orange peel

I am usually not a fan of queuing… except when it comes to the weekly saturday morning food shopping: when I head to my local shopping street not yet completely awake to pay a visit to my local butcher and greengrocer, I rarely have a clear idea of what I want to cook for the weekend. 

Worst is when I watch saturday’s kitchen first on bbc… My head is then filled with dozens of possible meals, new techniques I’d like to try… that pop up in my head at a frightening rythm while I  lurk at the mouthwatering etalage and observe what others will be cooking for the weekend. Blessed are the persons waiting for their turn in front of me, the more the better, giving me the time to put a little order in my head (except when they choose that last piece i finally decided to head for).

A couple of saturdays ago, the queue was particularly long queue at the butcher, which I didn’t mind as I was  hesitating between the guinea fowl, the pheasant and the venison… I thought I’d never manage to make up my mind when one of the guys before me chose the last guinea fowl opening the view to some hare somewhat hidden behind it. It looked so fresh…

Only problem left was that I’d probably have to fight with my dutchie about who would get to cook it! I was definitely convinced when I asked the butcher to have a better look at the saddle: it was still on the bone… which meant that I could make my dutchie happy by leaving him the honour of preparing the filets (what can I say, the guy loves playing with our kitchen knives),  keeping the cooking part for myself. Plus I could give a try at preparing homemade game stock with the bones.

Dinner was a feast for the tastebuds and for the eyes. The meat turned out amazingly tender and juicy. I served it with a sauce made of homemade game stock, white wine and slowly candied orange peel in honey (I found the recipe in the meat cookbook* I gave to my dutchie for Sinterklaas last year). To go with it, I made dutch style stewed red cabbage with apples delicately spiced with cloves and cinnammon and a homemade puree. And wouaouh, what a colourful dish: intense colours in tones of deep red, pink and orange, a perfect ode to automn.

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Where's the meat?

October 13th, 2007 § 0 comments § permalink

Lately, one of my carnivore relatives who had just discovered my blog made the remark that there was something essential missing on this blog: MEAT! I didn’t believe her until I went through my archives… Since I started this blog, I hardly published a couple of meat recipes. I was schoked, I had to rectify that.

So, readers, here is the truth: I am far from a vegeterian. I LOVE meat, all kinds of meat (except maybe some of the pork pieces). One of my favourites is a juicy and rare “cote de boeuf” from the barbecue… that says it all. I cook meat too: in tajines, stews, on the grill… Yet, I must admit that since I moved in with my dutchie and discovered his innate talent and pleasure in handling meat I often leave him my place in the kitchen when meat is involved. What can I say: when it comes to love… and perfectly cooked meat, it is all a matter of compromises!

If I can convince my dutchie in giving some of his secrets away, I’ll be introducing a new post category in the near feature to give you a glance of his cooking talents: there will be plenty of meat! In the mean time, here’s a sample of my personal meat recipes. The recipe itself is a chutney that makes a perfect stuffing or sauce with white meat (veal, chicken or pork “filet mignon”).

grapechutney_veal2006_1grapechutney_veal2006_2
grapes_chutney_chicken2007_2grapes_chutney_chicken2007
On top is the veal tenderloin version, below is the chicken version.
Personnaly I have a little preference for the veal. I leave the choice to you!

Grapes chutney saus

prep: 10 min cook: 15 min

Ingredients:
400g ripe green grapes (preferably without pit)
1 small red oignon
1 tsp of rasped fresh ginger
1 pinch of cinnamon
1 clove
10 cl dry fruity white wine (chardonnay, viognier…)
1 knob of butter
sea salt and pepper to taste.

Wash the grapes, peel half of them and then halve them all, remove the pits if necessary. Chop the oignon in thin slices. In a small cooking pan, sauteed the grapes, oignon and spices with the butter for 5 min on high fire. Add the wine and bring to boil. Lower the fire after the 1st boil. Leave to reduce for 10min (check once in a while so that you don’t end up with burned jam).This chutney is perfect to use as a filling or a sauce with white meat such as chicken filet, veal or pork filet mignon. I like to make a crust of filo or puff pastry around the meat. Then bake in the oven at 200 deg C for 10 to 20 min depending on the weight of your meat portions.Bon appétit!

Where’s the meat?

October 13th, 2007 § 0 comments § permalink

Lately, one of my carnivore relatives who had just discovered my blog made the remark that there was something essential missing on this blog: MEAT! I didn’t believe her until I went through my archives… Since I started this blog, I hardly published a couple of meat recipes. I was schoked, I had to rectify that.

So, readers, here is the truth: I am far from a vegeterian. I LOVE meat, all kinds of meat (except maybe some of the pork pieces). One of my favourites is a juicy and rare “cote de boeuf” from the barbecue… that says it all. I cook meat too: in tajines, stews, on the grill… Yet, I must admit that since I moved in with my dutchie and discovered his innate talent and pleasure in handling meat I often leave him my place in the kitchen when meat is involved. What can I say: when it comes to love… and perfectly cooked meat, it is all a matter of compromises!

If I can convince my dutchie in giving some of his secrets away, I’ll be introducing a new post category in the near feature to give you a glance of his cooking talents: there will be plenty of meat! In the mean time, here’s a sample of my personal meat recipes. The recipe itself is a chutney that makes a perfect stuffing or sauce with white meat (veal, chicken or pork “filet mignon”).

grapechutney_veal2006_1grapechutney_veal2006_2
grapes_chutney_chicken2007_2grapes_chutney_chicken2007
On top is the veal tenderloin version, below is the chicken version.
Personnaly I have a little preference for the veal. I leave the choice to you!

Grapes chutney saus

prep: 10 min cook: 15 min

Ingredients:
400g ripe green grapes (preferably without pit)
1 small red oignon
1 tsp of rasped fresh ginger
1 pinch of cinnamon
1 clove
10 cl dry fruity white wine (chardonnay, viognier…)
1 knob of butter
sea salt and pepper to taste.

Wash the grapes, peel half of them and then halve them all, remove the pits if necessary. Chop the oignon in thin slices. In a small cooking pan, sauteed the grapes, oignon and spices with the butter for 5 min on high fire. Add the wine and bring to boil. Lower the fire after the 1st boil. Leave to reduce for 10min (check once in a while so that you don’t end up with burned jam).This chutney is perfect to use as a filling or a sauce with white meat such as chicken filet, veal or pork filet mignon. I like to make a crust of filo or puff pastry around the meat. Then bake in the oven at 200 deg C for 10 to 20 min depending on the weight of your meat portions.Bon appétit!

Italy in the garden

October 3rd, 2007 § 0 comments § permalink

I’ve never been known for my “green fingers”. Every time someone offers me a plant that need a slight bit of attention, I can’t help but thinking “Oh no, how long is it going to last under my care”.
Yet, after three years in our house, me and my dutchie finally managed to made a garden out of our garden, with green grass, healthy looking and flowering plants and all kinds of herbs… a miracle.

garden_tomatoes

For the veggies, we’ll have to give it another try next year though: out of my three plants of tomatoes and my plants of strawberries, I hardly managed to get a dozen of half eaten strawberries (damn snails!), a dozen of cherry tomatoes (at the rate of ~2 per month) and a dozen of roma tomatoes (out of 30 that just ended up rotting before even turning red… damn weather!).

Nonetheless, proud of my tomato harvest… my little head started boiling with ideas of beautiful tomato salads to present my very own tomatoes to the world (or let’s say the maximum I could feed with my dozen of tomatoes: my dutchie and a close group of friends… ). Before settling on a final recipe, I thought I should at least try one tomato… What a disappointment: with the lack of sun this summer, it must really have been a struggle to get to maturity. The flavour was there, but the structure was terrible (what we would call “farineuse” in french, literraly ‘”floury”). Bye bye salads! my tomatoes were only good for a tomato sauce. A great tomato sauce though, with herbs from the garden as well of course….

cannelonis

Canneloni with fresh tomato saus
Canneloni aux tomates du jardin

serves 4. prep: 15 min cook: 15 min + 35 min

Ingredients:
16 cannelonis
8 Roma tomatoes (that’s all I had)
400g minced beef
100g minced pork
2
small oignons
1 small clove of garlic
a small handful parsley
a few twigs of thyme
1 twig of rosemary
1 laurier leave
4 Tsp olive oil
5cl red wine
3 Tsp freshly grated parmeggiano
a pinch of cayenne chilipepper
sea salt, pepper

Preheat your oven to 180 deg C. Wash and peel the oignons. Chop 1 1/2 thinly. Press the remaining half with a garlic press. Chop half of the thyme and rosemary thinly. Put the minced meat in a bowl, add a third of the chopped oignons, the pressed oignon, the parsley, and the chopped rosemary and thyme, season with sea salt and pepper and mix alltogether with your hands. Reserve.

Set some water to boil in a large pan and in a smaller one. In the larger pan cook the cannelonis for three minutes in the boiling water. Then rince in cold water to stop the cooking. Add a few drops of olive oil to prevent them sticking to each other. Reserve for later.

Wash the tomatoes and plunge them for 1 min in the boiling water in the remaining pan. Peel the tomatoes, remove the seeds and chop them. Blend the tomatoes for 30s with 1Tsp olive oil. Sauteed the oignons and pressed garlic clove briefley with 1Tsp of olive oil in a cooking pan. Add the blended tomatoes, and remaining herbs. Season with sea salt, pepper and cayenne chilipepper. When it gets to boil, add the wine and lower the fire. Leave to reduce for 15min.

In the meantime, fill the cannelonis with the minced meat and lay them in a large oiled oven dish. When it’s done pour the tomato sauce over the cannelonis. Cover with aluminium foil and bake in the oven for 35 min. Remove the foil 10min befor the end.  Sprinkle the grated parmeggiano over the dish and serve immediately.

Bon appétit!

nb. I prefer to use minced veal but it’s hard to find at the supermarket in holland and my butcher was closed.
nb2. You might wonder why I only add the cheese at the end… Well, for the simple reason that my dutchie cannot stand cheese (damn it!). I am condemned to add the cheese in my own plate or to make sure his part remains absolutely cheese-free. I was however very happily surprised by the result. I loved the taste of the freshly grated cheese on the cannelonis.

"Blog appétit" or how to become a foodblog addict (EN)

May 25th, 2006 § 0 comments § permalink

As promised: a translation of my contribution to Blog appetit (I have tried without much success to make it a bit more concise than the french version, because frankly… I talk too much!)

As I acknowledged to my french readers, I have a secret: the “blog appetit” contest is at the origin of my food blog addiction… Everything started about a year ago when I inadvertantly discovered the website. Since, beside my growing addiction to food blogs, I have been secretely cherishing the dream of creating my very own blog and of course participating to Blog appetit myself. In my small dutch kitchen I have been working on most editions… but I still had to have a blog. Two months ago  (I know, rapidity is not my speciality), I finally did it with My Kitchen Diaries.

asparagus_bouquet2
The most sexy dutch blonds!

After what I just told you, there was no way I would miss the latest edition. The idea of the contest is simple: food bloggers propose a recipe based on two season ingredients chosen by the Blog appetit team. For each edition, a famous chef or gastronomy figure judges the submitted recipes and proposes aher own creation. For this edition, the stars of the show were strawberries and asparagus. It might seem like a strange pairing to more than one of you, but I was thrilled: I just love both of them. At home the precious “guariguettes” strawberries my mom would buy at the market had trouble to get to the table as I was stealing them directly from the basket! Still today, I cannot imagine one of my birthdays without strawberries. As far as asparagus are concerned, I was spoiled too. I grew up in Languedoc where we would buy beautiful green asparagus directly at the field, through most of spring and summer. I would pick up wild aparagus in the guarrigue as well. Mmmm, I still remember the taste of a wild asparagus omelette! Luckily, nowadays, I am still spoiled with these two ingredients. The sandy soils of the flat country where I now live is generous in my two spring favourites. Local strawberries are fragrant and tasty and the asparagus, the dutch white gold, so delicate and tender… You got it, I love them too. Thanks to Blog appetit I ate as many as wanted this year… for the sake of culinary experimentation of course!

After several attempts, I chose for a starter. It is quite a simple dish as this is how I enjoy to cook. I wanted to highlight the strawberries and asparagus and therefore I didn’t add many other flavours. To enhance my two star ingredients, I chose for vanilla that I regularly use in my asparagus dressing and argan oil for a nutty (moroccan) touch.

Here is the result:

aspege_mousse11

aspege_mousse23 

Mousse d’asperges blanches a la vanille et son coulis de fraises a l’huile d’argan
(Asparagus and vanilla mousse with its strawberry and argan oil dressing)

6 pers. prep: 20 min cook.:35 min

Ingredients:
For the mousse:
500 g asparagus
2 eggs
1/2 vanille pod
1 Tsp. “creme fraiche” with 15% fat (or sour cream)
salt, pepper

for the dressing:
5 ripe and fragrant dutch strawberries
4 or five asparagus ends (4 ou 5)
1 tsp. raspberry vinegar
1 Tsp. argan oil
5cl cooking water from the asparagus
fleur de sel, pepper
For decoration purposes (and because it’s good):
a few peeled dutch shrimps (the little grey ones)
ricottas sandy biscuits (salty ones of course)
asparagus tips (green, white or both)
strawberries

For the mousse, I was inspired by the recipe of Auyo on marmiton (fr) : Preheat your oven at 170 degres. Peel the asparagus. Cook them in salted boiling water, together with ends and peels, until tender (about 15 min). Put aside 4 or five asparagus ends (by this I mean the bottom part by the way) and about 5 cl of the cooking water. Drain the asparagus well and dry them in a kitchen towel. Put them in the bowl of your food processor and add the vanilla seeds that you will have scrapped from the pod, the eggs, the creme fraiche. Season with salt and pepper. Mix until you get a smooth cream. Pour into 6 greased little moulds. Stand these in an appropriately sized oven dish filled with water half-way up the moulds. Bake in the preheated oven for approximately 35 min until the mousse has set (adjust according to your oven). Take out of the oven and leave to cool.For the dressing, pour the ingredients in the food processor, mix until smooth. Refrigerate.

Ideally, this starter should be prepared in advance (the day before or in the morning for the evening) so that flavours have time to develop. Serve the mousse slightly warm, with the dressing chilled. Dress your plates with one mousse, and a ribbon of dressing around (im my picture, it is more a pond than a riibon!). According to your moodand imagination, add strawberries and asparagus tips. I added one ricotta sandy biscuit and some dutch grey shrimps. The shrimps were a real plus and where a great combination with the mousse. I didn’t reveal the ingredients to my guinea pigs until after they tasted. It was a success.

Blog appétit!

… If you happen to have some leftover dressing, here is a very simple but appealing apetizer:

asperge_stjacques1 

The scallop is just seared, seasoned with fleur de sel, ground pepper and vanilla

If you know a little bit of french, I advise you to go and have a look at the other creations proposed by talented food bloggers for this blog appetit edition. From risotto and chutney to asparagus sorbet and sweets… some are really amazing. An overview of all recipes is available here.

“Blog appétit” or how to become a foodblog addict (EN)

May 25th, 2006 § 0 comments § permalink

As promised: a translation of my contribution to Blog appetit (I have tried without much success to make it a bit more concise than the french version, because frankly… I talk too much!)

As I acknowledged to my french readers, I have a secret: the “blog appetit” contest is at the origin of my food blog addiction… Everything started about a year ago when I inadvertantly discovered the website. Since, beside my growing addiction to food blogs, I have been secretely cherishing the dream of creating my very own blog and of course participating to Blog appetit myself. In my small dutch kitchen I have been working on most editions… but I still had to have a blog. Two months ago  (I know, rapidity is not my speciality), I finally did it with My Kitchen Diaries.

asparagus_bouquet2
The most sexy dutch blonds!

After what I just told you, there was no way I would miss the latest edition. The idea of the contest is simple: food bloggers propose a recipe based on two season ingredients chosen by the Blog appetit team. For each edition, a famous chef or gastronomy figure judges the submitted recipes and proposes aher own creation. For this edition, the stars of the show were strawberries and asparagus. It might seem like a strange pairing to more than one of you, but I was thrilled: I just love both of them. At home the precious “guariguettes” strawberries my mom would buy at the market had trouble to get to the table as I was stealing them directly from the basket! Still today, I cannot imagine one of my birthdays without strawberries. As far as asparagus are concerned, I was spoiled too. I grew up in Languedoc where we would buy beautiful green asparagus directly at the field, through most of spring and summer. I would pick up wild aparagus in the guarrigue as well. Mmmm, I still remember the taste of a wild asparagus omelette! Luckily, nowadays, I am still spoiled with these two ingredients. The sandy soils of the flat country where I now live is generous in my two spring favourites. Local strawberries are fragrant and tasty and the asparagus, the dutch white gold, so delicate and tender… You got it, I love them too. Thanks to Blog appetit I ate as many as wanted this year… for the sake of culinary experimentation of course!

After several attempts, I chose for a starter. It is quite a simple dish as this is how I enjoy to cook. I wanted to highlight the strawberries and asparagus and therefore I didn’t add many other flavours. To enhance my two star ingredients, I chose for vanilla that I regularly use in my asparagus dressing and argan oil for a nutty (moroccan) touch.

Here is the result:

aspege_mousse11

aspege_mousse23 

Mousse d’asperges blanches a la vanille et son coulis de fraises a l’huile d’argan
(Asparagus and vanilla mousse with its strawberry and argan oil dressing)

6 pers. prep: 20 min cook.:35 min

Ingredients:
For the mousse:
500 g asparagus
2 eggs
1/2 vanille pod
1 Tsp. “creme fraiche” with 15% fat (or sour cream)
salt, pepper

for the dressing:
5 ripe and fragrant dutch strawberries
4 or five asparagus ends (4 ou 5)
1 tsp. raspberry vinegar
1 Tsp. argan oil
5cl cooking water from the asparagus
fleur de sel, pepper
For decoration purposes (and because it’s good):
a few peeled dutch shrimps (the little grey ones)
ricottas sandy biscuits (salty ones of course)
asparagus tips (green, white or both)
strawberries

For the mousse, I was inspired by the recipe of Auyo on marmiton (fr) : Preheat your oven at 170 degres. Peel the asparagus. Cook them in salted boiling water, together with ends and peels, until tender (about 15 min). Put aside 4 or five asparagus ends (by this I mean the bottom part by the way) and about 5 cl of the cooking water. Drain the asparagus well and dry them in a kitchen towel. Put them in the bowl of your food processor and add the vanilla seeds that you will have scrapped from the pod, the eggs, the creme fraiche. Season with salt and pepper. Mix until you get a smooth cream. Pour into 6 greased little moulds. Stand these in an appropriately sized oven dish filled with water half-way up the moulds. Bake in the preheated oven for approximately 35 min until the mousse has set (adjust according to your oven). Take out of the oven and leave to cool.For the dressing, pour the ingredients in the food processor, mix until smooth. Refrigerate.

Ideally, this starter should be prepared in advance (the day before or in the morning for the evening) so that flavours have time to develop. Serve the mousse slightly warm, with the dressing chilled. Dress your plates with one mousse, and a ribbon of dressing around (im my picture, it is more a pond than a riibon!). According to your moodand imagination, add strawberries and asparagus tips. I added one ricotta sandy biscuit and some dutch grey shrimps. The shrimps were a real plus and where a great combination with the mousse. I didn’t reveal the ingredients to my guinea pigs until after they tasted. It was a success.

Blog appétit!

… If you happen to have some leftover dressing, here is a very simple but appealing apetizer:

asperge_stjacques1 

The scallop is just seared, seasoned with fleur de sel, ground pepper and vanilla

If you know a little bit of french, I advise you to go and have a look at the other creations proposed by talented food bloggers for this blog appetit edition. From risotto and chutney to asparagus sorbet and sweets… some are really amazing. An overview of all recipes is available here.

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