A Christmas special: Chicken breast sous-vide, shiitake and sake sauce

December 16th, 2015 § 2 comments § permalink

Second opus of this year Christmas menu… The main, chicken. It’s a fun one and it will make an impression. We’re gonna cook sous-vide today.

Don’t be scared, it’s easy, I promise (and you don’t need fancy equipment to try it).

Chicken breast sous-vide, shiitake and sake sauce

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Asparagus… Bite the seasons*!

May 14th, 2013 § 2 comments § permalink

Farm chicken with asparagus, chervil and lemon

They are here at last. Asparagus. Green and white. Purple too.
We’ve had to wait a while this year.
Asparagus

A bit more crooked than other years. Still so pretty too me.
So good. Sweet, slightly pungeant.
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Chicken Teriyaki with love

February 7th, 2013 § 2 comments § permalink

At home, I am the sweet tooth. Dutchie’s sweet spot is meat, and above all: chicken. I know I just can have him melt for a bucket of fried chicken or a good chicken Teriyaki.

Chicken Teriyaki
Fried chicken ain’t nothing for me and it might take some more years before I get to fry chicken.

Teriyaki is another story. It’s the Tarte Tatin to our chicken… Something between me and him.

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New year’s detox: ‘A fowl in the pot’

January 8th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

Pintade 'au pot'

La poule au pot… One of the ultimate feel-good/comfort/healing foods in French households. A [huge] pot, a chicken [a hen originally], veggies and more veggies, water and not much more. [yes, chicken soup if you insist]

As a ‘true Francaise’ ūüėČ , I believe it to be a remedy against the cold, the flu, the broken hearts, the end of the year indigestions, etc.

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Who's afraid of the Christmas turkey?

December 14th, 2008 § 0 comments § permalink

Qua Christmas traditions,¬†there’s more than enough to choose from in the family: French on my side, Dutch¬†and British for my other half (my ‘dutchie’ is also half brit)…
Usually, I pick a bit of everything (well, with a lot from French, to be completely honest).
With the years, my Christmas eve dinners have turned up as a joyous multicultural mess:

From oysters and foie gras next to the more northern style heartwarming soups
, the Chapon, the goose¬†or the game, the French Christmas log or fancy entremet and the¬†British Christmas pudding, the dutch cookies and spices…. Except for one thing: Turkey.

dinde
Lesson learned: unless the bird is bigger than you or your oven, a turkey is nothing to be afraid of!

Not that I don’t like it or that it’s extremely difficult to prepare. Maybe I’ve been secretely traumatised by monster sized turkeys ending up on the head of Mr Bean or Joe in Friends. Maybe I had some bad experiences with dried out turkeys and concrete like compact stuffings that almost make you choke. Maybe I just grew up inspired by my mum’s constant search for mouthwatering originality in the kitchen… Well, actually, I think it was just another of these dishes that for some hidden inconscious feeling I didn’t dare to cook. Just like cheesecakes before.

Anyway, last year I finally gave in my dutchie’s wishes for a good old¬†Christmas turkey, and I must say that with a little organisation and a lot of faith, it¬†turned out¬†good, really good:¬†
It was golden on the outside, tender on the inside, delicately perfumed with truffle that I inserted under the skin and the traditionnal stuffing with chestnuts was rich, fragrant and comforting yet not to compact thanks to the addition of grated apples and silky greek yoghurt. I served it with a simple gravy made of the cooking juices, sauteed green beans with wild mushrooms and celeriac mash.

And you, will you dare turkey this Christmas?

 

» Read the rest of this entry «

Who’s afraid of the Christmas turkey?

December 14th, 2008 § 0 comments § permalink

Qua Christmas traditions,¬†there’s more than enough to choose from in the family: French on my side, Dutch¬†and British for my other half (my ‘dutchie’ is also half brit)…
Usually, I pick a bit of everything (well, with a lot from French, to be completely honest).
With the years, my Christmas eve dinners have turned up as a joyous multicultural mess:

From oysters and foie gras next to the more northern style heartwarming soups
, the Chapon, the goose¬†or the game, the French Christmas log or fancy entremet and the¬†British Christmas pudding, the dutch cookies and spices…. Except for one thing: Turkey.

dinde
Lesson learned: unless the bird is bigger than you or your oven, a turkey is nothing to be afraid of!

Not that I don’t like it or that it’s extremely difficult to prepare. Maybe I’ve been secretely traumatised by monster sized turkeys ending up on the head of Mr Bean or Joe in Friends. Maybe I had some bad experiences with dried out turkeys and concrete like compact stuffings that almost make you choke. Maybe I just grew up inspired by my mum’s constant search for mouthwatering originality in the kitchen… Well, actually, I think it was just another of these dishes that for some hidden inconscious feeling I didn’t dare to cook. Just like cheesecakes before.

Anyway, last year I finally gave in my dutchie’s wishes for a good old¬†Christmas turkey, and I must say that with a little organisation and a lot of faith, it¬†turned out¬†good, really good:¬†
It was golden on the outside, tender on the inside, delicately perfumed with truffle that I inserted under the skin and the traditionnal stuffing with chestnuts was rich, fragrant and comforting yet not to compact thanks to the addition of grated apples and silky greek yoghurt. I served it with a simple gravy made of the cooking juices, sauteed green beans with wild mushrooms and celeriac mash.

And you, will you dare turkey this Christmas?

 

» Read the rest of this entry «

My kitchen goes skiing!

March 7th, 2008 § 0 comments § permalink

Les menuires

The kitchen will be closed for the coming 10 days… It’s time for well deserved holidays.
Ok almost closed: it seems I’m the designated cook for the trip.
In the mean time here’s something to spice up your week a little!

See u soon!

Chicken and prawns red thai curry

4 pers. prep: 20 min cook: 15min + 10 min

Ingredients:
500g chicken filet (~3)
250g tiger prawns (raw and peeled)

400g mixed vegetables (for ex. peppers, green beans,
soja, chinese cabbage, oignons, leaks, carrots…)
cleaned, peeled and chopped400ml coconut milk
3 Tsp red curry paste
2 Tsp fish saus (Nuoc Nam)
2 Tsp brown sugar
a few kafir leaves (or 1 tsp pureed lemongrass)
5 Tsp. wok oil (or olive oil)
a handfull fresh thai basil
sea salt, pepper

Prepare your ingredients: dice your chicken filet into ~ 2/2.5 cm dices, prepare the prawns (in my case unfreeze them!), wash, peel and slice the vegetables thinly (or if you’re in a hurry use a ready “asian like” vegetable mix from your favourite supermarket…). Set aside, ready next to the stove. In a small cooking pan, mix the curry paste (I usually start with 2Tsp and adjust during the reduction), sugar, fish saus and coconut milk, add the kafir leaves or lemongrass and cook on low fire for about 15 min until the saus reduces from one third. 15 min before serving time, bring half of the oil to warm up in a wok or large pan on high fire. Sauteed the chicken for 5 min (you might need 2 rounds, so that your chicken get quickly seared and golden). Reserve. In the same wok/pan, sauteed the prawns for a couple of minutes until colored. Reserve, with the chicken. Still in the same pan, add the rest of the oil, sauteed the vegetables 3 to 4 minuts until seared but still crunchy, lower the fire, add the curry saus, chicken and prawns, cook for five more minutes. Just before serving, add the roughly cut basil, transfer to your seving dish, serve and enjoy right away, with some rice and eventually some warm nans.

Bon appétit!
 

Lemon rice
4 pers. prep: 5 min cook: 15min

Ingredients:
300g pandan or thai rice,
100ml coconut milk,
500ml water,
the zest of a lemon,
1 lemongrass stick,
sea salt and pepper to taste.
In a pan, pour the rice and cold liquids. Add the lemon zest and lemongrass, season to taste. Bring to boil on normal fire, then cover up and lower the fire. After about 15 min, the liquids are absorbed and your rice is ready.

Where’s the meat?

October 13th, 2007 § 0 comments § permalink

Lately, one of my carnivore relatives who had just discovered my blog made the remark that there was something essential missing on this blog: MEAT! I didn’t believe her until I went through my archives… Since I started this blog, I hardly published a couple of meat recipes. I was schoked, I had to rectify that.

So, readers, here is the truth: I am far from a vegeterian. I LOVE meat, all kinds of meat (except maybe some of the pork pieces). One of my favourites is a juicy and rare “cote de boeuf” from the barbecue… that says it all. I cook meat too: in tajines, stews, on the grill… Yet, I must admit that since I moved in with my dutchie and discovered his innate talent and pleasure in handling meat I often leave him my place in the kitchen when meat is involved. What can I say: when it comes to love… and perfectly cooked meat, it is all a matter of compromises!

If I can convince my dutchie in giving some of his secrets away, I’ll be introducing a new post category in the near feature to give you a glance of his cooking talents: there will be plenty of meat! In the mean time, here’s a sample of my personal meat recipes. The recipe itself is a chutney that makes a perfect stuffing or sauce with white meat (veal, chicken or pork “filet mignon”).

grapechutney_veal2006_1grapechutney_veal2006_2
grapes_chutney_chicken2007_2grapes_chutney_chicken2007
On top is the veal tenderloin version, below is the chicken version.
Personnaly I have a little preference for the veal. I leave the choice to you!

Grapes chutney saus

prep: 10 min cook: 15 min

Ingredients:
400g ripe green grapes (preferably without pit)
1 small red oignon
1 tsp of rasped fresh ginger
1 pinch of cinnamon
1 clove
10 cl dry fruity white wine (chardonnay, viognier…)
1 knob of butter
sea salt and pepper to taste.

Wash the grapes, peel half of them and then halve them all, remove the pits if necessary. Chop the oignon in thin slices. In a small cooking pan, sauteed the grapes, oignon and spices with the butter for 5 min on high fire. Add the wine and bring to boil. Lower the fire after the 1st boil. Leave to reduce for 10min (check once in a while so that you don’t end up with burned jam).This chutney is perfect to use as a filling or a sauce with white meat such as chicken filet, veal or pork filet mignon. I like to make a crust of filo or¬†puff pastry around the meat. Then bake in the oven at 200 deg C for 10 to 20 min depending on the weight of your meat portions.Bon app√©tit!

Where's the meat?

October 13th, 2007 § 0 comments § permalink

Lately, one of my carnivore relatives who had just discovered my blog made the remark that there was something essential missing on this blog: MEAT! I didn’t believe her until I went through my archives… Since I started this blog, I hardly published a couple of meat recipes. I was schoked, I had to rectify that.

So, readers, here is the truth: I am far from a vegeterian. I LOVE meat, all kinds of meat (except maybe some of the pork pieces). One of my favourites is a juicy and rare “cote de boeuf” from the barbecue… that says it all. I cook meat too: in tajines, stews, on the grill… Yet, I must admit that since I moved in with my dutchie and discovered his innate talent and pleasure in handling meat I often leave him my place in the kitchen when meat is involved. What can I say: when it comes to love… and perfectly cooked meat, it is all a matter of compromises!

If I can convince my dutchie in giving some of his secrets away, I’ll be introducing a new post category in the near feature to give you a glance of his cooking talents: there will be plenty of meat! In the mean time, here’s a sample of my personal meat recipes. The recipe itself is a chutney that makes a perfect stuffing or sauce with white meat (veal, chicken or pork “filet mignon”).

grapechutney_veal2006_1grapechutney_veal2006_2
grapes_chutney_chicken2007_2grapes_chutney_chicken2007
On top is the veal tenderloin version, below is the chicken version.
Personnaly I have a little preference for the veal. I leave the choice to you!

Grapes chutney saus

prep: 10 min cook: 15 min

Ingredients:
400g ripe green grapes (preferably without pit)
1 small red oignon
1 tsp of rasped fresh ginger
1 pinch of cinnamon
1 clove
10 cl dry fruity white wine (chardonnay, viognier…)
1 knob of butter
sea salt and pepper to taste.

Wash the grapes, peel half of them and then halve them all, remove the pits if necessary. Chop the oignon in thin slices. In a small cooking pan, sauteed the grapes, oignon and spices with the butter for 5 min on high fire. Add the wine and bring to boil. Lower the fire after the 1st boil. Leave to reduce for 10min (check once in a while so that you don’t end up with burned jam).This chutney is perfect to use as a filling or a sauce with white meat such as chicken filet, veal or pork filet mignon. I like to make a crust of filo or¬†puff pastry around the meat. Then bake in the oven at 200 deg C for 10 to 20 min depending on the weight of your meat portions.Bon app√©tit!

Saturday night fever…

April 9th, 2006 § 0 comments § permalink

Yesterday afternoon, I left my man at home while I went ahead for a crazy shopping afternoon.
To compensate for my late return (long after all the shops had closed), I brought back a few delicacies for a romantic diner a deux. In my shopping basket were among others some guinea fowl and a dozen dutch oysters from Zeeland.

I entered the house like a tornado looking forward to show off my discoveries to my man,… only to found him lying on the couch, a plaid on his shoulders, looking back at me slowly with feverish eyes: “….. I’m siiiiiick”. He smiled gently at me when he found out about the guinea fowl and the oysters and then mumbled… “can we go to bed early tonight?”. How could I resist? The romantic dinner and the oysters would have to wait… (He was in no state to open them anyway). A quick and comforting dinner it had to be. After a quick look in my fridge and cupboards, I had gathered some fig mustard, as well as some honeycake mustard from Dijon brought from our latest trip to france and some Calvados bought in Normandy a couple of years ago… Half an hour later, diner was served! The fragrant smells of apple, mustard and calvados woke up his apetite.

pintade_calvadosmoutarde

 

Guinea fowl marinated in calvados and mustard
(supremes de pintade marines a la moutarde et au calvados)

2 pers. prep: 10 min, cooking: 10min

Ingredients:
2 guinea fowls breasts (~300g)
2 Tsp. mustard (I used a mix of fig and honeycake mustard)
5 Tsp. apple sauce
15 cl. calvados
1 shallot
10 g butter
sea salt, pepper

In a bowl, mix the mustard, half of the calvados, 2 Tsp. of apple sauce and the chopped shallot. Add the seasoned guinea fowl. Leave to marinate for as long as you wish can: 15 min was all I got!
Warm half of the butter in a pan. Put in the marinated breasts and the marinade and cook for about 7 to 8 min on high heat. Lower the heat when the meat is golden on both sides. When the meat is almost cooked, add the rest of the apple saus, butter and calvados. Raise the fire for 1 min to finish up the saus.
Serve promptly.

Bon appetit!

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