A Berbere vegetarian tajine

January 30th, 2013 § 4 comments § permalink

Berbere vegetarian tajine

So, cooking for Moroccan Quirky Friday was so much fun. Thanks to Christine and to those who joined in the fun and had a taste of my Moroccan cuisine! Special thanks too to my friend Sophie for being such a dedicated and talented sous-chef!

Many asked for the recipes of the tajines I cooked that evening…
» Read the rest of this entry «

Monday’s quickie special: roasted roots and sausage…

January 31st, 2011 § 4 comments § permalink

On mondays, I like quickies… food-wise I mean. Uncomplicated food, comfy, and prep’ed in minutes. Something to rest from my weekend cooking frenzies. Something to start the week on a good bite.

Roasted root vegetables and sausage

I’m sure you enjoy them too, once in a while and probably more often that you dare to admit…

So, let me introduce a new style of recipes on the blog: the ‘Monday’s quickie specials’. No long stories, no fancy step by step recipes. Just ‘a little bit of this and a lot of that’ kind of cooking. Hope you like these quickies as much as we do ūüėČ !

Here we go…

» Read the rest of this entry «

Lovely ugly roots, part 1: Celeriac

November 13th, 2010 § 2 comments § permalink

These ugly underground veggies, these crooked roots, gnarled tubers and knotty bulbs…. celeriac, carrots, turnips, beets and other old fashioned parsnips, parsley roots, salsify and Jerusalem artichokes.

Don’t lie! I am pretty sure that at least once in your life you have looked at them with disdain at your local market or greengrocer, preferring them those shiny colorful imported zucchini and other asparagus…
Let’s face it, they look kind of drab, covered in clods of earth and mud, tainted with painful memories of hunger and poverty and war and ration cards.

Lovely Ugly Roots
This weekend’s market harvest… from top down: celeriac, white carrot, black carrot and parsnip.

» Read the rest of this entry «

Un bol de soupe pour Sophie!

January 15th, 2009 § 3 comments § permalink

There’s nothing like a fuming cup of Erwtensoep (dutch pea soup) to warm¬†you up from head to toe during the cold dutch winter days…

Ewrtensoep

My friend Sophie would definitely agree with me… Although, she might not be¬†the most¬†objective on that one: she likes it so much she would also ask for it when visiting me in april! She’s been begging for the recipe for years now…¬†With¬†the great tips¬†provided by¬†my butcher and the icy weather¬†from the last couple of weeks I really didn’t have anymore excuses to keep¬†her waiting any longer, so here it is…

» Read the rest of this entry «

Dutch comfy food for a monthly mingle

January 27th, 2008 § 5 comments § permalink

In the heart of the dutch winter, when it’s freezing cold outside, dark and rainy, when my stomach crave for some comfort food that will warm me up from head to toe… I cook dutch!¬†When it comes to winter comfort food, dutch know their way in the kitchen: steaming hot erwtensoup (pea soup) with smoked sausage, creamy potato hutspot* or stamppot* with chicory or¬†boerenkool,¬†served with meatballs, sausages or bacon and a rich flavoured gravy… Might not¬†sound like¬†michelin star¬†gastronomy to you, but I¬†assure you,¬†once you have tried the real homemade stuff, you’ll ask for more.¬†

I’ve been willing to post about my¬†weakness for dutch winter food since the beginning of the winter season but didn’t come to it yet.¬†Then last week, I stumbled over the theme¬†of¬†the Monthly Mingle event organised by Meetah from What’s for lunch honey? : comfort food! What a perfect occasion. Further,¬†some days ago,¬† while having dinner in a dutch “Eetcaf√©”, I¬†couldn’t help overhearing¬†some expats at a table next to me complaining of the lack of culinary traditions in Holland….

So, to lovely Meetah and¬†to all the too many expats in the Netherlands who cannot stop complaining about the lack of culinary culture in this country… Here’s one of my dutch winter favourite comfort food, the dutch ‘boeuf bourguignon’, the king of dutch stews,¬†the ‘Hachee’. ¬†Lean stewing steak,¬†a lot of¬†shallots and oignons, browned in butter and delicately flavoured with juniper berries, bay leaves and cloves, simmered slowly¬†in a lot of beer until the meat falls apart… Lekker**!

Hachee
The king of dutch stews


My recipe is probably far from the traditionnal one but has been approved by many dutch so far. It is inspired from my favourite dutch cookbook¬†(in english! …didn’t speak dutch at the time I got it): “Dutch cooking – The new kitchen” from Manon Sikkel and Michiel Klonhammer.
Just like boeuf bourguignon, in private, I love to have my Hachee with macaroni. When I have guests, I’ll serve it with a celeriac mash. Always a success.¬†


Hachee
Dutch hash stew РBoeuf mijoté à la hollandaise

serves 6 pers.
prep: 30 min. cook: 2 hrs

Ingredients:
1.5 kg lean stewing steak, diced in chunks fom ~3×3 cm
1 handful flour,
60g butter,
200g shallots, peeled and chopped
500g onions, peeled and sliced thinly
500 ml beer,
1 Tsp sugar

2 bay leaves,
3 cloves,
6 juniper berries,
sea salt and pepper to taste,
optionnal: 2 slices of bread generously spread with mustard

Hachee ingredients


Put the pieces of meat in a plastic bac with a handful of flour and shake to coat the meat. Melt the 2 thirds¬†of the¬†butter (40g)¬†in a cocotte or heavy casserole and sear the meat on high heat (proceed in two¬†batches to get the meat nicely brown). Reserve the meat, add the remaining butter and sauteed the onions (reserve ~100 g for later)¬†and shallots¬†over¬†a low to medium heat until transparent.¬†Pour back¬†the meat, season to taste with sea salt and pepper and add the sugar, the cloves, bay leaves and juniper berries. — At that moment, the original recipe calls for¬†two slices of bread crust removed, spread with mustard and added in chunks to the cocotte which should help thicken the stew (use then 750ml beer). Somehow, I have always inadvertantly missed that step without consequences, but will surely try it next time.¬†— Then cover with beer and leave to simmer covered for about 2 hours. Serve hot with macaroni al dente or mashed¬†celeriac or potatoes.¬†

Eet smakkelijk!
potato
My dutch potato “stampper”

Mashed Celeriac
Purée de Céleri rave

serves 6 pers.
prep: 10 + 5 min. cook: 20 min
Ingredients:
1 celeriac (~800g), cleaned, peeled and diced in 2 cm x 2 cm chunks***
4 potatoes (~300g), cleaned, peeled and diced
30g butter,
10cl liquid cream,

1 Tsp coarse sea salt,
pepper to taste,

Put a large amount of water to boil together with 1 Tsp of sea salt. When the water is boiling, add the celeriac and potatoes and cook for 15 to 20 min on medium heat or until the celeriac and potato are tender. Drain. Add half of the liquid cream, slightly warmed, ¬†and mash using a fork or a dutch “stampper”¬† (don’t blend, the mash should be coarse). Add the butter and eventually add some more liquid cream to adjust the texture to your taste. Season with freshly crushed pepper. Serve hot!
If you wish, the vegetables can be boiled in advance, don’t drain and reserve covered until¬†15min before serving. Then reheat on low-fire, mash and season at the last moment.

Bon appétit!

* stamppot is a typical winter dutch dish calling for boiled potatoes coarsely mashed with roughly chopped season vegetables (raw or cooked) such as chicory, white loaf, carrots and oignons (this latest version being called hutspot)
** Lekker is dutch for yummy!
***  To avoid browning, keep covered in cold water seasoned with lemon juice

Running late for Christmas?

December 21st, 2007 § 1 comment § permalink

Eid, Christmas and Hanoeka are coming close…

christmas2

Are you all set? … I am not: the house is a mess, haven’t¬†had one minut yet¬†to think of my christmas dinner, still got to get the christmas tree, the presents… and my family will be at the door two days from now for a whole week of festivities! Sounds desperate… Well, nevermind! I’ve decided to (try to)¬†keep cool this year. *deep breath*. ¬†

In case some of you out there can recognise themselves, I thought I could share my christmas race with you (If I manage to fit posting in the program). 

First, I’ve got one tip for your christmas presents: Have you heard of the Menu for Hope raffle yet? If not, have a look… you’ve got until tonight to get a chance of winning amazing food related prizes worldwide (meals in world famous restaurants, culinary tours of your favourite cities, cooking equipment, signed cookbooks, cooking workshops…) while helping children in Lesotho getting food for lunch! Don’t miss it… I got tickets for the guided tour of El Bulli of course, a culinary tour of Barcelona and a lovely vintage print.

For the rest, my moto this year is: get organised and go simple!
(I know that my friends will no doubt get tears of laughter reading this…)

So in that spirit, here are a couple of tips for great homemade¬†appetizers that will impress your guests while being so simple and easy to prepare…

apetizers
Asparagus mousse, cheese sablés* and candied tomato tartlets

Mousse or soup shots always make a great impression, while they can be pretty easy and prepared in advance. The asparagus and vanilla mousse on the picture is based on the recipe I cooked for Blog Appétit quite a while ago. This time I used canned asparagus, and I baked the mousse in shot glasses for 20min. They can be prepared a couple of days in advance and kept in the refrigerator. For the decoration, I used green aspasragus tips blanched for a couple of minnutes an strips of smoked salmon. For Christmas, I am thinking of trying this with artichoke hearts instead of asparagus, with seared slices of scallops on top maybe.

pumpkin_cappucino
You can also think of shots with a celeriac or pumpkin cappuccino or creamy jerusalem artichokes soup topped wth scallops or langoustines.

For the celeriac, cook in half water, half milk until soft (~15min) and mix. For jerusalem artichokes, sauteed them with a small shallot before adding the liquids, spice to your taste. You can prepare and freeze these soups well in advance. Take out of the freezer the night before. On the day itself,¬†mix with liquid cream and warm up before serving. Top with whipped cream, seared scallops, truffles, langoustines, crushed hazelnuts, nutmeg, sechuan pepper… whatever fit your mood that day.

mini candied tomato tartlet
And what about homemade mini savoury tartlets? sounds to complicated…

The trick is to prepare a savoury shortcrust well in advance (70g flour, 30g powdered almonds, 60g butter, 1 Tsp milk, salt, pepper and any spices or herbs you fill like). Bake in mini silicon molds and freeze the tartlet bottoms. You’ll only need to take them out of the freezer a couple of hours in advance, garnish when¬†thawed and warm up in the oven.
I like to garnish them with homemade candied tomatoes, or spicy apple compote topped with ‘magret de canard’ (smoked duck breast), sauteed spinach and goat cheese or smoked trout… but really the possibilities are endless!

asperge_stJacques
And then, there’s the scallops… I love scallops, just seared served with a drop of argan or hazelnut oil, spiced with sechuan pepper, or with a strawberry coulis. Or mini blinis or baghrir (prepared in advanced and frozen), just warmed up, topped with creme fraiche with a touch of lemon or wasabi¬†and garnished with salmon or fish eggs.

I could go on for hours, but I’ve got to¬†seriously get started, so I’ll finish with¬†dried fruits… Prunes rolled in bacon and baked until crispy in the oven, dates filled with foie gras topped with sea salt and pepper. So easy!

Bon appétit and merry christmas!

*I’ll post the recipe later, I’ve got to run to the market…

 

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing entries tagged with celeriac at My Kitchen Diaries.